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Understanding reefs part 2: Artificial reefs and reef restoration
Energy, News, and Climate / Science / Science and Communication / Uncategorized

Understanding reefs part 2: Artificial reefs and reef restoration

Last month I wrote a post detailing what a reef is and why they should matter to you regardless of where you live. This month I am building off of that idea and talking about something that I get a lot of questions about. Artificial reefs and reef restoration. What is a reef? For review, … Continue reading

A summer pondering the stormwater ponds
Guest Posts / How do we science?

A summer pondering the stormwater ponds

This guest post was written by Adam Gold.  Adam is a second-year master’s student in the Curriculum for the Environment and Ecology (CEE) working at UNC IMS.  He works in the Piehler Lab researching urban stormwater and its effects on water quality.   Follow him on twitter at @acgold_04 for tweets about science and stormwater. This past summer, … Continue reading

Who is the REAL Queen Bee? A shrimp!
For Fun / Marine Life / Oddities in the Ocean / Science

Who is the REAL Queen Bee? A shrimp!

This week I was interested in writing about something wacky in marine systems. Being an ecologist, I tend to discuss organisms and their environment. So as I brainstormed what to write, I thought back to my time as a research technician at the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences (VIMS) with Dr. Emmett Duffy.  While working … Continue reading

Understanding Reefs part 1: Why reefs matter no matter where you live
Energy / Energy, News, and Climate / Science and Communication / Uncategorized

Understanding Reefs part 1: Why reefs matter no matter where you live

Reefs keep you and the people/places you care about safe. They also provide you and many others globally with food and money. Reefs are vital for life on this planet. Losing them would be a serious blow to global health and economics. Protecting them on a global scale is hard, but you can do your part with small lifestyle changes (eat sustainable seafood, lower your carbon footprint, and ditch single use items for reusable alternatives. Continue reading