Uh oh, Vibrio: Not your grandma’s bloomers
and Climate / For Fun / How do we science? / Marine Life / Science

Uh oh, Vibrio: Not your grandma’s bloomers

This guest post is by Rachel Canty. Rachel is a Master’s student at UNC Institute of Marine Sciences. Her research focuses on coastal microbial ecology, specifically on competing different strains of the human pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio vulnificus, against one another. Rachel’s claim to fame is that she once swam on a relay with Katie Ledecky (5-time … Continue reading

Science on the high seas
How do we science? / Marine Life / Science / Scientists in Action!

Science on the high seas

Here at UNC Marine Sciences, we have a really cool program that allows graduate students in the department to nominate and then select a seminar speaker to come to the university and give a talk. It’s a unique opportunity for students to select a speaker that not only conducts interesting, world-class research but that also … Continue reading

The scientific method in real life
How do we science? / Policy / Science

The scientific method in real life

One of the very first things anybody learns about science is the scientific method. Observation, hypothesis, experiment, conclusion. It’s the scientific creed. The motto scientists live by. But, despite the seemingly simple 4-steps, in reality, the scientific method is a tortuous path that can be slow, complicated, winding, and at times, incredibly frustrating. To really … Continue reading

Move over corals, phytoplankton are also impacted by climate change
and Climate / Marine Life / Science

Move over corals, phytoplankton are also impacted by climate change

When most people think about the impacts of climate change on the world’s oceans, they’re first thoughts are things like ‘corals’ and ‘ocean acidification’. And while these are both excellent examples of how climate change affects the oceans, they’re not the only ones. Science magazine recently published a great article by Hunter-Cevera et al., 2016 … Continue reading

Ruth Patrick’s Aquatic Pollution Revolution
Scientists in Action! / The HumanitSEAS

Ruth Patrick’s Aquatic Pollution Revolution

Science grad students are asked terrifying questions on the regular, but the very worst one comes from our moms.  It’s usually tacked onto an otherwise innocent conversation, when Mom will casually pause and say, “Honey, your latest oxygen flux data are truly fascinating!  By the way, have you met anyone lately?”  It’s enough to make … Continue reading