Don’t Krill My Vibe: A Tri-Trophic Mutualism in the Southern Ocean
Guest Posts / Marine Life

Don’t Krill My Vibe: A Tri-Trophic Mutualism in the Southern Ocean

This guest post was written by Julie Geyer.  Julie is a research technician in Joel Fodrie’s lab at the UNC Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, where her work focuses on the ecology of seagrass beds. She graduated from Cornell University in 2014, where she worked in both Nelson Hairston’s lab, as well as in … Continue reading

Why YOU Should Be Thinking More About Parasites
Guest Posts / Marine Life / Oddities in the Ocean

Why YOU Should Be Thinking More About Parasites

This guest post was written by Anastasia Quintana.  Anastasia is a 2nd-year PhD student at Duke (please don’t stop reading) who used to study marine parasite ecology at UCSB with Armand Kuris. Now she has switched fully into the social sciences, and studies with advisor Xavier Basurto how communities organize to manage their environmental resources. She is enthusiastic about … Continue reading

Superstitions at Sea: Why Bananas are Bad Luck
Guest Posts / The HumanitSEAS

Superstitions at Sea: Why Bananas are Bad Luck

This guest post was written by Becky Fitzula.  Becky, although an NC State graduate, has fallen into ranks as the Public Communications Technician at the UNC Institute of Marine Sciences (IMS). She has spent most of her time digging through the archives to discover the rich history surrounding IMS, but on occasion she has been … Continue reading

Mawwiage is what bwings us togeva today: How a simple snail intersects neuroscience and marine biology in exciting ways (Part III)
Guest Posts / How do we science? / Oddities in the Ocean / Science / Scientists in Action!

Mawwiage is what bwings us togeva today: How a simple snail intersects neuroscience and marine biology in exciting ways (Part III)

This is the third and final installment of our guest blog by Kevin Wolfe, a PhD student at TAMUCC How marine science benefits by studying a simple brain   The biomedical benefits of studying Aplysia are fairly obvious; learning about the human brain is easy using a simpler analogue. Parkinson’s disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, and … Continue reading

Mawwiage is what bwings us togeva today: How a simple snail intersects neuroscience and marine biology in exciting ways (Part II)
Guest Posts / How do we science? / Oddities in the Ocean / Science / Scientists in Action! / Technology

Mawwiage is what bwings us togeva today: How a simple snail intersects neuroscience and marine biology in exciting ways (Part II)

Part II of III in a series of guest posts by TAMUCC grad student Kevin Wolfe! How a marine snail became a cornerstone in learning and memory research I cannot emphasize enough how important Aplysia has been for the fields of learning and memory. Though the structure and function of the neuron itself was obtained … Continue reading

Can something in the ocean kill superbugs?
Guest Posts / How do we science? / Oddities in the Ocean / Science / Scientists in Action!

Can something in the ocean kill superbugs?

Today we have another guest post. This time from Maya, a fellow graduate student at UNC. Hello there, readers of UndertheC!! My name is Maya Nadimpalli, and I’m a PhD student in Environmental Microbiology at UNC’s School of Public Health. I’ve been taking a great Science Communication class this past semester with some of the … Continue reading