Understanding Reefs part 1: Why reefs matter no matter where you live
Energy / Energy, News, and Climate / Science and Communication / Uncategorized

Understanding Reefs part 1: Why reefs matter no matter where you live

Reefs keep you and the people/places you care about safe. They also provide you and many others globally with food and money. Reefs are vital for life on this planet. Losing them would be a serious blow to global health and economics. Protecting them on a global scale is hard, but you can do your part with small lifestyle changes (eat sustainable seafood, lower your carbon footprint, and ditch single use items for reusable alternatives. Continue reading

Does temperature dictate which corals can survive on a reef?
Energy, News, and Climate / Marine Life / Marine Preservation / Science / Scientists in Action! / Uncategorized

Does temperature dictate which corals can survive on a reef?

If you’ve been reading UNdertheC for while, then you know that I study coral reefs (specifically those in the Caribbean). If this is your first time here, welcome! Tell your friends 🙂 As the 4th year of my PhD dawns here at UNC, the first chapter of my dissertation work has finally been published in … Continue reading

The future of coral reefs: will super El Nino’s destroy “super” corals?
Energy, News, and Climate / Marine Life / Science

The future of coral reefs: will super El Nino’s destroy “super” corals?

Coral reefs are some of the most diverse and important ecosystems on earth. If you didn’t know that already you probably wouldn’t be here. For background on see these links (1, 2, 3). Also, reefs are beautiful and really cool (see below). However, corals are very sensitive to changes in their environment. They are especially … Continue reading

Even in so called “Super Corals” temperature is still Kryptonite
Energy, News, and Climate / Marine Life / Marine Preservation / Policy / Science

Even in so called “Super Corals” temperature is still Kryptonite

Can corals survive climate change? This is a question on the minds of many environmentalists and researchers these days. The short answer is: probably, but coral reefs as we know them likely cannot. Every coral may not go extinct, but reefs are degrading and will continue to do so if the status quo is not … Continue reading

Don’t Krill My Vibe: A Tri-Trophic Mutualism in the Southern Ocean
Guest Posts / Marine Life

Don’t Krill My Vibe: A Tri-Trophic Mutualism in the Southern Ocean

This guest post was written by Julie Geyer.  Julie is a research technician in Joel Fodrie’s lab at the UNC Chapel Hill Institute of Marine Sciences, where her work focuses on the ecology of seagrass beds. She graduated from Cornell University in 2014, where she worked in both Nelson Hairston’s lab, as well as in … Continue reading

What I did this summer: how corals can teach us about climate (Castillo Lab Field Work 2015)
Energy / How do we science? / Marine Life / News / Scientists in Action!

What I did this summer: how corals can teach us about climate (Castillo Lab Field Work 2015)

As those of you who follow myself (@jbaumann3), the blog (@underthecblog), or my lab (@castillocorals) on social media may know, our lab has spent the better part of our summer in field collecting coral cores. The coral cores in the image above were extracted from various reefs across the Florida Keys. Before I tell you … Continue reading

Scientist of the Month – Dr. Sarah Davies
How do we science? / Science / Scientists in Action!

Scientist of the Month – Dr. Sarah Davies

This week we’re reviving our Scientist of the Month feature with an interview with Dr. Sarah Davies, a postdoctoral researcher in Karl Castillo’s coral reef ecophysiology lab. Davies studies how corals and their algal symbionts alter the expression of their genes in response to ocean warming and acidification. To learn more about her research, check out … Continue reading

Tiny cilia help corals exchange Oxygen and nutrients with the environment
Marine Life / Oddities in the Ocean / Science

Tiny cilia help corals exchange Oxygen and nutrients with the environment

In a new study made available last week via PNAS, MIT scientists (and list of multi-national, multi-disciplinary) collaborators have uncovered that corals can actually manipulate flow near their bodies and are not left to depend solely on the whims of ambient flow. Corals are sessile and depend on flow to exchange nutrients and dissolved gases … Continue reading