Oh Whale Shark, Where Art Thou?
Marine Life / Marine Preservation

Oh Whale Shark, Where Art Thou?

Once again, it’s Shark Week on Discovery Channel. As a marine scientist I can’t condone the unholy union of fact and fiction which has seemed to characterize this year’s programming (see “Shark of Darkness: Wrath of Submarine” and “Megalodon: The Shark That Lives”), but I can’t deny that sharks are pretty awesome. Despite evidence that a … Continue reading

Science Communication Errwhere! The Top 5 Things I Learned at ComSciCon 2014
Conference Rundowns / Policy / Science / Science and Communication / Top 5

Science Communication Errwhere! The Top 5 Things I Learned at ComSciCon 2014

This past week, I was lucky enough to attend ComSciCon 2014 in Boston. ComSciCon stands for the “Communicating Science Conference” and is basically a workshop run by graduate students, for graduate students, so we can get together, share ideas, and ultimately become better science communicators. The workshop was a whirlwind of panel discussions, writing sessions, 1 … Continue reading

Living with Diatoms Part I: A Marine Science Podcast!
Oddities in the Ocean / Podcasts and Videos / Science

Living with Diatoms Part I: A Marine Science Podcast!

Today I have something a little different to share–my first ever podcast! It’s diatom-themed (of course) and in it I discuss what diatoms are, what it’s like to research them, and why you should care about them in the first place. I’m far more used to writing blog posts than creating something audio-based, so this … Continue reading

The Sci-Poetry of Sleeping Dinoflagellates
Oddities in the Ocean / Science / The HumanitSEAS

The Sci-Poetry of Sleeping Dinoflagellates

Dinoflagellate; the combination of the Greek δῖνος/dinos, “whirling” and Latin flagellum, “whip, scourge.”  I recently ran across a poem, written back in 2001 by a scientist named Mary Harrington who was in the midst of some phytoplankton research. She published her poem, transcribed below, in the Journal of Biological Rhythms. Science to follow! — FEEDBACK If the lazy dinoflagellate … Continue reading